The evil actions of danforth abigail

The audience is first introduced to the judges, Danforth and Hathorne, in Act 3 during the trials. They clearly take the side of the lying girls no matter what type of evidence is being presented to them by the accused.

The evil actions of danforth abigail

It was a play with emotional feelings;feelings of angerhate, and evil, yet feelings of manipulation, good, andpureness.

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It was the Crucible. A fireball of guilt, evil, and good compiledinto one magnification. The play contained many scenarios of good versus evil, and the characterswho generally possessed these feelings and intentions.

But it must beunderstood t hat there were the intentions, the incentives, and then theactions taken out on a person or a group of people. Every character couldeither be placed in the intentions under good or bad intentions. Aft erthat, almost every character has mixed feelings of evil or good actions.

The fight between the centre of evil and the centre of good is theforemost important of the points. Abigail Williams is the nucleus of allevil in the story. Sh e is the one who triggers off this sense of hate inthe play. She tempts Proctor into lechery, and comm its unlawful acts whichall are against the Puritan religion.

Best Abigail Williams Analysis - The Crucible

To escape punishment for dancing, shedeflects the actions and blames them on someone else, and does not care howmany lives she ruins. La ter when she grows into power and influence, sheseems to enjoy sending these innocent peopl e their deaths. She takespleasure in her lies, and thrives on the attention and power that th eybring her.

All these are the aspects of being the evil character. Power,attention, and acts of w rongful doing.

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Therefore she can be labelled withbeing the evil character in the novel. She uses evi l actions disguised asgood by admitting who was with the devil. Of course the people she accusesa re actually innocent, but she has the ability to manipulate people intobelieving that she is doin g good. This again is evil.

The centre of good can be labelled as John Proctor. He is considere d the'hero' of theProctor tells Danforth his interpretation of Abigail’s actions and intent, attributing her actions first to lust, then to vengeance: “God help me, I lusted, and there is a promise in such sweat.

But it is a whore’s vengeance, and you must see it” (Act 3, p. ). Abigail is jealous and sees how Tituba is praised after she confesses; as Gods light in the world, looking for evil.

Abigail accuses several women of working with the Devil so she too can be praised (). It is Danforth's stern rationality that makes him a more disturbing figure; he is not a malicious villain equivalent to Abigail, but rather a man who has intense faith in the integrity of his court.

Giles Corey thinks Putnam is accusing neighbors of witchcraft because Putnam wants to

He operates under the assumption that good and evil can be clearly and intensely defined, a flaw of tragic irony. Abigail Williams is the nucleus of all evil in the story.

Sh e is the one who triggers off this sense of hate in the play. Sh e is the one who triggers off this sense of hate in the play.

The evil actions of danforth abigail

She tempts Proctor into lechery, and comm its unlawful acts which all are against the Puritan religion. PROCTOR: Oh, Francis, I wish you had some evil in you that you might know me. (To Danforth:) A man will not cast away his good name.

The evil actions of danforth abigail

You surely know that. Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself.

If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps.

Expert Answers

Proctor tells Danforth his interpretation of Abigail’s actions and intent, attributing her actions first to lust, then to vengeance: “God help me, I lusted, and there is a promise in such sweat.

But it is a whore’s vengeance, and you must see it” (Act 3, p. ).

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